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Stas Politis, CPFA®
Stas Politis, CPFA®
Upward Wealth Group, LLC Employer-Sponsored Plan Advisor & Investment Representative
https://www.upwardwealthgroup.com (561) 345-3992

At Upward Wealth Group, we understand the critical role of employer-sponsored plans in talent retention and employee financial well-being. By reducing financial stress, these plans foster a healthier work environment and enhance productivity and performance. With our tailored approach, we ensure that your company's retirement plan is not just effective but also aligned with your organizational goals.

Our services cater to a diverse clientele, including self-employed professionals, entrepreneurs, business owners, and executives/trustees seeking to optimize their retirement savings. With decades of experience and a commitment to personalized solutions, we specialize in crafting employer-sponsored retirement plans that suit your specific requirements. Whether you prefer a straightforward, easy-to-administer plan or a more intricate one tailored to your unique circumstances, we've got you covered.

Given their substantial contribution to our retirement nest eggs, we recognize the significance of 401(k) plans in retirement planning. It's essential to synchronize all your savings and investments inside and outside employer-sponsored retirement plans to maximize their combined potential in achieving your retirement objectives. By harmonizing these elements, we can build a comprehensive portfolio that works synergistically toward securing your financial future.

Let's collaborate to design a retirement plan that meets regulatory requirements, empowers your employees, and positions your business for long-term success. Reach out to us today to embark on this journey toward financial security and prosperity.

Why Regular Rebalancing Makes Sense

Investment Read Time: 2 min

Everyone loves a winner. If an investment is successful, most people naturally want to stick with it. But is that the best approach?

It may sound counterintuitive, but it may be possible to have too much of a good thing. Over time, the performance of different investments can shift a portfolio’s intent – and its risk profile. It’s a phenomenon sometimes referred to as “risk creep,” and it happens when a portfolio has its risk profile shift over time.

When deciding how to allocate investments, many start by taking into account their time horizon, risk tolerance, and specific goals. Next, individual investments are selected that pursue the overall objective. If all the investments selected had the same return, that balance – that allocation – would remain steady for a period of time. But if the investments have varying returns, over time, the portfolio may bear little resemblance to its original allocation.

Rebalancing is the process of restoring a portfolio to its original risk profile. But remember, asset allocation is an approach to help manage investment risk. Asset allocation does not guarantee against investment loss.

There are two ways to rebalance a portfolio.

The first is to use new money. When adding money to a portfolio, allocate these new funds to those assets or asset classes that have underperformed.

For example, if one investment fell from 40% of a portfolio to 30%, consider purchasing more of that investment to return the portfolio to its original 40% allocation. Diversification is an investment principle designed to manage risk. However, diversification does not guarantee against a loss.

The second way of rebalancing is to sell enough of the “winners” to buy more underperforming assets. Ironically, this type of rebalancing actually forces you to buy low and sell high.

Keep in mind, however, that the information in this material is not intended as tax advice, and may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult your tax professional before rebalancing. Rebalancing by selling “winners” may result in a taxable event.

Periodically rebalancing your portfolio to match your desired risk tolerance is a sound practice regardless of the market conditions. One approach is to set a specific time each year to schedule an appointment to review your portfolio and determine if adjustments are appropriate.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG, LLC, is not affiliated with the named broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. Copyright FMG Suite.

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